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Author Topic: Playing drums and bass in one band?  (Read 2550 times)
Elizabeth Albrecht
Laying down lows for the Lord...
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Posts: 56



« on: January 03, 2008, 04:07:24 PM »

Basically our band sign-up for Christian Union was a flood of Freshers (1st year students) , and somehow there's now 6 bassists. There is no particular standard that musicians have to be- we're a strictly voluntary band and anyone who feels that they are good enough can join. We've also got no rota or schedule so we're expected to turn up to band when we're called. This has resulted in me not knowing when I'm performing and me playing alongside musicians of a fairly poor standard.
So I'm thinking of swapping to drums, giving me a chance of playing my second instrument in a public setting, and also meaning that I would have a more regular band schedule, as there is only a handful of drummers to choose from in our CU.


Opinions anyone?


PS My comment about some of the other band members being poor standard players may seem arrogant or terrible but I'm simply fed-up of musicians who simply cannot play in a band situation. I also know my limitations unlike many of the musicians I meet generally. 
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'Praise Him with strings' Psalm 150
OldBassDude
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Posts: 118



« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2008, 10:04:21 AM »

I would hate to see you switch to drums out of frustration.  Whether you do or not though, the band situation clearly needs to be dealt with more effectively.

Who is in charge of the band?  There seems to be a real need for leadership and organization in this situation.  For example, there is no excuse for not letting musicians know well in advance when they are playing.
   
Frankly, every worship team that I've been part of has had some weaker musicians.  I've seen situations with weaker musicians handled very badly and at other times handled very well.  When handled badly, it causes resentment and anger and general reluctance to serve. 

One thing to emphasize is that to worship God as individuals is a something we are all expected to do.  On the other hand, to lead worship is a privilege that needs to be earned.  There are many Scriptures that refer to the skill and training of worship musicians (e.g., 1 Chronicles 25:6-8).  And as musicians on a worship team we are all worship leaders, whether we think of ourselves as such or not.

For example, when my two kids were starting out on bass and drums, they were obviously not strong musicians.  After months of working with me and some drummers, they initially were invited to sit in on practices and work with the musicians, but not perform publicly.  Next, they were made part of a youth band that played for the youth group.  Finally, when they were considered good enough, they were invited to play with the adult band on Sunday mornings.  They now serve regularly in the adult rotation, but only because they earned it. 

It's always better to deal with that situation in advance and to have a plan in place to develop musicians.  We all should be developing/mentoring young musicians just as we should be training other disciples in any area of service anyway.  However, once you are already in the situation, there are still ways to deal with it.  Anything you do needs to be handled very delicately so as not to hurt people's feelings nor discourage service. 

Again, the key to all of this is effective and yet sensitive leadership.  This is one of the situations where a Christian leader needs to be an effective "shepherd", knowing the people in his/her care and knowing how to best deal with each one.
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Elizabeth Albrecht
Laying down lows for the Lord...
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 56



« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2008, 04:40:23 PM »

I'm not swapping instruments out of frustration, only a feeling that my other talents could be used in this band situation.


  As for the organisation and also the leadership situation, I think that in my OP I was overreacting. Our bandleaders do do an excellent job in what they do. Again, we rely as a group on musicians coming forward from the main CU membership who are willing to give their time, skills and instruments to the CU and we have to be thankful that we have had this number of people come forward, regardless of whether or not they are good or bad.
  I think that as a CU we can't get too exclusive about something like this. Trial rotas and sit-ins work fine with church groups due to their need for them, and the fact that many church bands are almost semi-pro standard. I'm not saying that my CU's band isn' a good quality band but we don't have time or want for any extra work. We're also not here to tutor members- the simple rule with us is that if the bandleader thinks you aren't good enough, they will tell you and you won't be put back on rota until you improve. Luckily this isn't the case.

  So you DO have to earn your place in the band, by showing you can play the songs without problem.
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'Praise Him with strings' Psalm 150
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