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Author Topic: New vs. Old  (Read 8210 times)
Stock R
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« on: September 27, 2007, 04:41:41 PM »

What is everyone's opinion on playing newer songs (2006/2007)?  Personally I have nothing against older songs, and as the other thread shows, some of the Matt Redman, Chris Tomlin, Tim Hughes songs are classes and are VERY popular among churches.  However, looking down the list, most of the top 25 contemporary worship songs are 5+ years older now.

How does you/your church react to playing newer songs?  I have found that the strength of some of those songs are weakening for me as it seems like they are on repeat sometimes.  I believe they are great songs and they certainly changed my view and heart on worship, but week after week for 5-10 years seems to have worn them out.

 
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danders
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2007, 08:21:21 AM »

We're dealing with the old vs new question now but perhaps in a slightly different manner than you intended to ask about.  Our church just started mixing in songs other than the traditional hymns with piano and organ about ten years ago.  Our sets now consist mainly of "new songs" although we still do at least one hymn per week, sometimes more.  An issue for another thread is at least some in our congregation would like for the hymns to be done in the traditional manner - apparently they don't count as hymns otherwise and our ratio of hymns to other songs goes way down.  So, to our congregation many of the songs on the list of 25 are new.   How does our church react to the introduction of new songs?  Well, it's been a struggle.  Participation is sometimes low (so I'm told, my concentration is too focused on hitting the right notes at the right time to notice too much of what's going on in the congregation) and as I mentioned before I think some would still prefer doing hymns in the traditional manner with just a piano and organ.

I do agree that when a song has lost its impact it's time to set it aside and give it some rest.  Each of us can have a preference of one song over another but I remembering hearing a couple of weeks ago something to the effect of "oh no, not again" from one of the guitar players during practice that I think was more a reaction to how frequently a song has been used rather than a personal dislike for the song.

Dave
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Jong Lee
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« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2007, 05:36:18 PM »

Although I like playing new songs, I find it takes the congregation a while to warm up to a new tune. Our congegration sings with us, and it usually takes a few time before they sing and raise their hands in worship to a new song. The exception is if the song is very simple and easy to sing along to.

I like playing old hymns, but I like new arrangements. There's power in a song sung by generations of believers around the world, but a fresh arrangement is good for keeping the Worship Team's interest in a song.

Luckily at our church, the Saturday evening service is contemporary music wise, while the Sunday service is more liturgical with old hymns.
 
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embellisher
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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2007, 04:41:33 AM »

I agree with Jong about 'freshening up' old hymns. I love some of them played in the traditional style, albeit with drums, bass and guitars added. But some hymns have a 'tired' sound to the music, but very poignant lyrics, and deserve to be revived with a newer arrangement.
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Mick D
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« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2007, 10:58:38 AM »

We've been doing mostly new stuff (Matt Maher, Chris Tomlin, David Crowder, etc..)
The kids coming to the Lifeteen mass already listen to and know most of our material before we do so there really hasn't been any problems as far as the congregation is concerned.
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Revp98
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« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2007, 03:40:03 AM »

I thought I would shed a little insight on this matter. I don't think that there is anything wrong with new songs. However, it is the old stuff that got us through to where we are today. Then you have to think of the context of what the song is. An example, your Pastor is ministering to the people, in most cases an old worship song might be in order. Or if your service is kind of dry, something new might be better. It is more of learning how to balance and filter what might be fitting for your church. I think the bottom line here is that we have to be extremely careful about what we decide to play and how we present it. The thing to remember here is this, everybody who records a Gospel, Contemporary Gospel, Christian, or anything recorded about God is not necessarily saved and Holy Ghost filled. But what you do want is to get the message over to the congregation. And as long as we all remember and understand that what we are doing is a ministry, we will be fine. Peace.
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Revp
DoctorNik
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Hello Everybody!


« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2007, 10:37:27 AM »

here's a neat little story...
Once had a Pastor that discounted all 'old' songs (ie hymns, old worship choruses etc),, saying, they had their day,, they're old, stale,, etc etc etc (he also said there's no room for a Hammond B3 in Church music anymore.... ) He personally told me, that "Jesus Loves Me", is NOT to be used in his church,, to old yadda yadda...
Following week, my wife and I were invited to a special service with a good friend and former youth pastor we grew to know and love,,, + he's a fantastic guitar player and worship leader...

Anyway,, we strike off for an evening of worship,, he's guitar, me bass, wife keyboard, his wife, him and my wife vocals,, (you do NOT want to hear me sing lol).. new worship song after new worship song,, some I've never heard of.. some familiar,,,, then guess what...

yup,, he launched us into a 10 minute rendition of Jesus Love Me...   wasn't a dry eye in the house,, the altar filled up with people prone before our God and Creator... adults and youth praying and waiting on God.. our vocalists couldn't sing anymore,, the Spirit was moving with power...

so much for old vs new huh??

God can and does use whatever HE wants to use whenever HE wants to use it,,, our job is to be open to HIS will and direction.. and be awed and amazed..

thanks for your time..


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tony c
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« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2007, 04:51:40 AM »

My new church was a Baptist church way back when, so there is still the tradition of singing hymns, maybe once a week or ever other week, and that's cool.  The WL willl select "ontemporary" songs that are anywhere from 1 to 31 years old, like old Maranatha stuff or stuff from the "Touching the Father's Heart" series that Vineyard put out years ago.  I personally like Redman, Tomlin, and the like, style, but you kind of have to look at the complete congregatonal mix.  If you've got some older folks, you put some hymns in.  If it's a youth service, you kick it up a notch - but even then, if you contemporize a hymn, it'll go well.
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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2007, 03:25:15 PM »

Personally I like doing the newer songs but the old ones are very good also. We try and match the songs to the message being given so it takes a mix of the old and new. I guess also by doing both you can kind of please everyone or at least try to.  Grin
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OldBassDude
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« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2007, 01:42:49 PM »

At our church we typically play one new song each week.  For example, recently we have played "Song of Hope" and "Rise" from the new Robbie Seay Band album "Give Yourself Away".  [We actually played "Song of Hope" the week the album came out.]  We've also played a couple of songs from the new Crowder album "Remedy".  Next week we are going to play "What This World Needs" from the latest Casting Crowns album "The Altar and the Door".

We introduce these new songs as "sermon songs", and the congregation doesn't sing on those.  The other songs, which the congregation does sing along with, are typically 1-5 years old and could be standard songs by Chris Tomlin, David Crowder, Third Day, and other favorites that the congregation probably knows.  Every once in a while we'll throw something in from 5-10 years ago, maybe even an old U2 song.

So, we try to mix it up while not springing too many new songs on the congregation at once.
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Jong Lee
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« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2007, 03:15:59 PM »

One of the things I find powerful about a new song is to bring back people to the church after they had left for a while. It's those songs that might conjure up memories of spirituality, fellowship, etc from their younger years that reignite their passion when they return to church. Also, some of those old tunes like "Jesus Loves Me" are more familiar to the unchurched than something by David Crowder. What is contemporary to us, is pretty unknown to the unchurched.
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imacman9
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« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2010, 07:26:39 PM »

Yeah there is definitely and anointing on some of the older hymns - I Exalt Thee? I mean thats a classic! To me theres nothing better than a song like I Exalt Thee with a modern arrangement it's so powerful and moving! 
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1954bassman
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« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2010, 05:44:07 PM »

For me, a good song is a good song. Period. The annointing is what will make the difference.

That said, I know that at our church, we try to work up strong material. We also sometimes learn a current 'radio hit'. I think folks do enjoy hearing a song that they are hearing on the FM christian station.

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Bass with Grace
tank
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« Reply #13 on: November 14, 2010, 11:29:04 AM »

At our small church we still play the old hymns but with the drums, bass, acoustic and electric guitars added in with the grand piano and organ during our Sunday morning blended service (8:10 am) We usually play 3 to 4 and add one contemporary song at the the end.  During the 10:45 service which is a contemporary service we might put one hymn in the set every so often.  This goes over quite well for our church.  The funny thing though is that when our Worship Choir (I'm a tenor) presents special music,  the southern gospel type songs get a better response from both services than do the newer contemporary arrangements.  It's all for the Lord though so it is all good!!!!  Cheesy
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Walk by Faith
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« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2010, 07:07:13 AM »

"New" is good ... keeps things fresh.  The only problem with "new" is that the congregation can get a little "removed" from worship sometimes with an unfamiliar song.  If the melody is simple, that helps a lot.  Personally, I think one new song per week is plenty.  Play it again the next week, and see if the congregation is more worshipful with it.  If, so, consider keeping it around.

However, I must say I love the old "standards/classics."  There is a reason why the became classic ... they are well written, both lyrically and musically.  Generally speaking, the lyrics are straight forward biblically and the melody is easy to follow.  For those that might say, "it's had its day" -- take one of those hymns and work it with a more modern feel.  I'm sure you'd be quite surprised at the results.  Great prasie music from the "old days" is still great praise music "these days!"  (I'd say the same for secular stuff too ...)

Think about Christmas music .... 100's of years old.  Gosh I can listen to any version of "O Holy Night" at anytime of the year!  From acapella to TSO ... the chording and melody are superb, no matter what version or style.

In the end, I suppose the important thing is that the WL's song selection "fits" the congregation ... afterall, why are worship teams there?  To be a tool of the LORD to aid in bring others to a worshipful time ... It's not about what "I" like to play, but rather, what would help others to worship our Savior. 

Just my thoughts ...

Be Blessed!

Carl
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Whom have I in heaven but You?  And there is none upon earth that I desire besides You.  My flesh and my heart fail; but God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.
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