Worship Bass
September 24, 2017, 10:31:26 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Worship Bass
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
Author Topic: Is there a market for a Kansas, Yes, Rush type band in modern Christian music?  (Read 19383 times)
JohnH
Full Member
***
Posts: 241


WWW
« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2008, 05:06:28 PM »

Niiiice.  I gotta download me some Neal Morse when I get home. Smiley
THANKS!!!!
Logged

"God hears the song in your heart."
"Yeah.  But we have to hear you play."
Why Skill Really Does Matter - Ken Boer and Pat Sczebel
Redbyrd
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 67



« Reply #16 on: August 16, 2009, 09:30:52 PM »

I enjoyed the songs I listened to on your myspace page. I hope that things work out for you guys. I live about 30 miles west of Cleveland, so if you are ever performing anywhere close to my area I will try to come to your performance.
Logged

"We shall pass this way on Earth but once, if there is any kindness we can show, or good act we can do, let us do it now, for we will never pass this way again."- Stephen Grellet
Ajish4
Newbie
*
Posts: 15



« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2009, 08:28:59 AM »

Wow.

What a GREAT SOUND.

Without a DOUBT, you guys are on to something.

I'm partial, I'm a HUGE YES, Moody Blues, Pink Floyd, ELP Prog fan. The motivating factor for my playing to this day is Chris Squire.
I think it is a great idea.

I've recently been lucky enough to meet my mentor a few times in the last two years, for that I am truly thankful. He was BETTER in real life
that I EVER would have expected a "rock star" to be. So very humble, and grounded. A wonder ful man.

There are SO many PROG fans out there. Just take a peak at
Yesfans.com for example. There are PROG sites out there as well, but I just don't remember what they are.

GO FOR IT. I'd LOVE to be palying something like this.

I too would LOVE a CD when you guys get one printed.
Logged
slejhamer
Newbie
*
Posts: 24



« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2009, 06:24:30 PM »

Randy George plays with Neal Morse and Mike Portnoy;  Randy's other project is Ajalon, who have a new album out.  The first two were kind of folksy acoustic prog; the new one is a bit more contemporary.  There's definitely some of Neal Morse's influence in the latest.

Check 'em out!

Instrumental tune: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uI4uoirACc&feature=related
Older one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWP11KU2NZc

New album soundclips:  http://www.progrockrecords.com/shop/view.php?id=202&PHPSESSID=bc50dd38a62de3e215a0b08a7a17ebc9

Band info:  http://www.ajalon.net/news.htm





Logged

Mitch
weldon29
Newbie
*
Posts: 9


« Reply #19 on: December 06, 2009, 07:43:43 PM »

You guys sound great!
Logged
mousekillaz
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 59



« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2009, 05:32:43 PM »

Sounds great ! keep it going 
Logged

After careful thorough meticulous exacting examining scrutinizing reviewing and postulating I have concluded that I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing. Fortunately, for me,  God does!  Paul R.
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Newbie
*
Posts: 21



« Reply #21 on: December 22, 2009, 03:18:27 PM »


I read Kerry Livgrens autobiography (which my brother in law thought I had given him instead of loaned him and he threw it away Sad ).  He was raised in a Christian family, his father might even have been a minister, I can't remember, but he went through just about every religion out there, including something called the at-man or with a guy called the at-man. 

Much of Livgrens varied religious experiences influenced Kansas music.  When Kerry came back to Christ and that began to influence Kansas music, the lead singer at the time (Elefante??) put up with it for a while but eventually left because he was tired of singing "those lyrics".

I believe it was Warren Ham who came in to be Kansas lead singer, shortly before they dissolved.  Livgren and Ham then formed "AD" on the Kerygma music label (yes, I did grab a CD and look it up). (Woop!  wrong!  Ham left Kansas then later joined Livgren to form AD - if Wikipedia is correct.)

Close but not quite!  Steve Walsh was Kansas’ original singer.  From what I remember of Kerry’s autobio, (and as noted) Kerry was raised a Christian and turned away from the faith in his teen years, and was seeking the “real truth” during his Kansas years, moving from one philosophy or false religion to another.  Many of his songs had strong spiritual overtones.  Naturally, when he returned to Christianity, he began writing Christian-themed songs, starting with the “Audio Visions” album.  Steve Wash quickly grew tired of Kerry’s new direction and walked out, IIR , during the “Vinyl Confessions” sessions.  Walsh was replaced by John Elephante.  IIR, Warren Ham and Michael Gleason were both among those who auditioned to replace Walsh.  Both of them subsequently toured with Kansas in auxiliary capacity – background singers, keyboards and saxophone (Ham).

Kerry mused in his bio how peculiar it was that for all those years Steve Walsh had no compunction about singing any of Kerry’s “religion of the month” songs, but would rather quit a successful rock band at the top of their game than sing Christian-themed songs.

By the way, Kerry’s 1980 solo project “Seeds of Change” stands in my mind as one of the greatest-ever Christian rock albums.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Logged

Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Newbie
*
Posts: 21



« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2009, 03:50:29 PM »

Regarding the OP’s question, I love the music, great stuff.  But unfortunately I don’t have high hopes for your success in the Christian market.  Success requires promotion, and promotion requires radio play.  Unfortunately these days Christian radio stations pretty much play nothing but P&W.  The fact that such dreary, monotonous music is a commercial success in the Christian market shows what you’re up against.  My son was in an excellent Christian rock band in the 90s, Animal Couch (start your listening demo with Shiney Clock) that toiled for nine years in churches and clubs trying to get a crossover breakthrough.  A recurring critique from both sides of the aisle was that they were too secular for Christian audiences and too Christian for secular audiences.

Speaking of – I must say I don’t get the compulsion of so many Christian musicians to be well, Christian musicians.  Music seems to be the only discipline where you find this mentality.  Anyone ever meet an accountant or lawyer who says, “Sorry, I only have Christian clients?”  A carpenter or construction contractor who says, “Sorry, we only build or remodel churches?”

What’s wrong with being something like Diamond Rio or U2 – not a Christian rock or Christian C&W band, but a band of Christians making a living in the secular market, like the rest of us do with whatever skills or talents God gave us? 

We Christians tend to complain about the pathetic state of secular media (and rightly so), but we don’t seem inclined to give the world a positive alternative.  I guarantee there is no shortage of unsaved people who would like to see some music and movies that’s positive, clean, and intelligent.  You might not get big enough to fill stadiums, but you could probably at least make a good living doing something that you love doing.

So why not “tone things down” and make them less “preachy,” and then hit the clubs?  Kansas’ “Vinyl Confessions” and “Drastic Measures” albums, as well as Kerry Livgren’s “Seeds of Change” are only a couple of examples of how you can do Christian themed music that can appeal to secular audiences.  One or two overtly evangelistic songs on a CD or a set would be enough to drive home your point.  For a more contemporary example, Eisley is a group of Christian kids who seem to be doing pretty well for themselves in the secular market offering up excellent positive music.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt

Logged

CRBMoA
Full Member
***
Posts: 157



« Reply #23 on: December 23, 2009, 10:29:16 AM »

Wayne,

It is good to see you posting. I enjoy your insight and experience.

My take on the 'Christian Musican' thing;

I, along with most musicians I associate with, play music as a Worship Musician.

I have a day job that God has provided to meet and exceed my needs.

I have done music as a business. As soon as money changes hands, things change.

I am a Title Officer, which means nothing to most people, so let's just call me a real estate mechanic.

If I do mechanic work for you, you get to tell me what to do (within reason and professional practices and ethics), you pay me, I render services.

Once the band leader starts investing money in studio time, promotions, etc.....once the label starts fronting money.....you become an employee. I won't do that anymore, but some people do. IMO, a professional musician is really paid to travel.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2009, 04:26:49 PM by CRBMoA » Logged

2 Cor 10:5
JohnH
Full Member
***
Posts: 241


WWW
« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2009, 03:32:28 PM »

"What’s wrong with being something like Diamond Rio or U2 – not a Christian rock or Christian C&W band, but a band of Christians making a living in the secular market, like the rest of us do with whatever skills or talents God gave us?"

Wayne, I heard an interview with the band Addison Road.  They described themselves exactly as you state above - Musicians, who are Christian, playing music.
Logged

"God hears the song in your heart."
"Yeah.  But we have to hear you play."
Why Skill Really Does Matter - Ken Boer and Pat Sczebel
mousekillaz
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 59



« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2009, 01:42:47 AM »

I believe that your group should  follow the music wherever the Holy Spirit leads you. Don't concern yourselves with  success, that is for our Creator to  bestow. If you are serving God, as his  servant , your music is heard by The Greatest Audience any human could ever hope for. If your desire is get airplay then I would suggest sticking to the formula that the station programmers use. Todays Praise and Worship music is inherently simple for the most part. It is pleasing to the ear with simple intuitive melodies that are  easy to sing along with   which is why they get covered by worship teams  across the nation.    So How about a Jazz Metal Worship Team that drives with the infectious grooves from 80's funk and dance music???      Am I twisted  or what?
Logged

After careful thorough meticulous exacting examining scrutinizing reviewing and postulating I have concluded that I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing. Fortunately, for me,  God does!  Paul R.
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.14 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!