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Author Topic: Compressor on bass  (Read 10912 times)
Graeme Polly
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Posts: 4


« on: May 31, 2009, 09:13:50 PM »

Hi everyone.
I have played bass most of my life, and always chased that perfect sound, where a player like Abraham Laborial (sorry if spelling is wrong), or Lewis Johnston, Nathan East etc can have a great solid sound then start playing slap and have all the depth and twang in the world.
I know a lot is a quality bass, most is technic but I have also been thinking that it might also be compression and or a little chorus/flanger.

What is your thoughts on this?

Graeme
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danders
Jr. Member
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Posts: 84



« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2009, 05:40:09 PM »

I'm not sure if these guys use any effects or not but I suspect much of what we hear from them has had the attention of some pretty talented sound engineers, both during the original track recording and final mixing.  Some compression might be used in a live situation as you can acheive louder volumes (and everyone seems to think live needs to be loud - sorry, different rant for a different thread) but I'm not sure why they'd use it otherwise.  There was a time I was considering using a compressor, mainly as an attempt to even out my playing volume.  I think I've gotten a little better over time at controlling volume with my right hand so I've never actually tried using a compressor at church.  I do at home just because I already have one and I think it makes it easier to keep a lid on my volume. 

Dave
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Emibass
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Posts: 6


« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2009, 07:35:04 AM »

if you find a good compressor under 500$ post it here. But in my experience as a sound engineer it gave me good results the LA 610 DI and comp, the neve UAD 88RS, the LA 2A (both hardare and UAD version), the 1176 (hardware and UAD version).

I want to try out the distressor to see what it does as I was told it´s killer on bass.

I´d like to have a comp pedal that sounds good on bass
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...still learning
Eddy
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Posts: 143



« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2009, 08:01:15 AM »

Hi everyone.
I have played bass most of my life, and always chased that perfect sound, where a player like Abraham Laborial (sorry if spelling is wrong), or Lewis Johnston, Nathan East etc can have a great solid sound then start playing slap and have all the depth and twang in the world.
I know a lot is a quality bass, most is technic but I have also been thinking that it might also be compression and or a little chorus/flanger.

What is your thoughts on this?

Graeme

chorus/flanger and compression are vastly differing effects.

chorus and flanging are modulation effects, they give a somewhat 'warble' to the sound.  One of the best examples of flange is on the intro to You're No Good by Van Halen - link: http://www.lala.com/#song/360569449464725820

A compressor/limiter works with the dynamics.
Think of it this way, on a volume/loudness scale of 1-10 suppose you're playing and you hit some notes harder than others.
When you strike the note hard it goes to an 8, but when you you don't it's somewhere around a 4.
By adjusting a compressor you can raise the level of the softer notes, while simultaneously capping the harder notes. You could make the hard notes about a 9 while raising the soft ones to a 7, making the overall sound more even/smooth.
That's LESS dynamic range.

I have a flanger and a chorus on my pedal board. I use the chorus mostly with the fretless. The flanger for a more dramatic effect (like the Van Halen clip). I don't use a compressor live.
When I record, I record without a compressor but I have been known to compress the track after the fact if it's needed.

I hope this isn't vain rambling on my part and someone finds it helpful.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2009, 08:03:03 AM by Eddy » Logged

Nashville, like L.A. without a tan!
chrisfbass
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Posts: 141


Fivers and Worship Just Go Together!


« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2009, 04:08:58 AM »

I use one of these:

http://www.bossus.com/gear/productdetails.php?ProductId=154

Some years ago our church layout required that my amp was positioned directly behind the keyboards. A couple of our keyboard players would ask me to turn down a bit as I appeared to be "intruding" on their playing.

The bought the LMB3, told no-one and killed the problem at a stroke. I also get the benifit of an upper mid clarity which allows the notes cut through but not by mere volume.

Well recommended

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Chris
1954bassman
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Posts: 464



WWW
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2009, 12:41:23 PM »

Check this link on compressors:

http://www.ovnilab.com/index.shtml

I use a Symetrix 501 when I play at church. We do Praise and Worship, and I play quite aggressively.

My current 'live band' amp is an Eden WT390 which has a built-in 'dbx' style compression that I use a light touch of.

With my main gig, our acoustic Gospel group, I just run direct to the mixer, as I play fretless, and more of a smoother style.

I think a good compressor, set properly for the application also improves your tone and overall sound.

Mark
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Bass with Grace
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
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Posts: 21



« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2009, 03:45:30 PM »

if you find a good compressor under 500$ post it here.
I´d like to have a comp pedal that sounds good on bass.


dbx 160X? I’ve been using one in my rack for many years.

Hi everyone.
I have played bass most of my life, and always chased that perfect sound, where a player like Abraham Laborial (sorry if spelling is wrong), or Lewis Johnston, Nathan East etc can have a great solid sound then start playing slap and have all the depth and twang in the world.

Keep in mind that everything you hear from these guys has been touched up by top-notch engineers.  When you start the slap thing all the bottom end disappears, so there has to be some EQ compensation to get it back.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
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Brim
Full Member
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Posts: 192



« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2009, 07:18:05 PM »

dbx 160X? I’ve been using one in my rack for many years.

I tried a 160A  in my rack for a while, but I couldn't tell the difference live...I got rid of it. I don't slap very often but when I do, the FOH engineer tells me my signals gets hotter (louder), he just backs the slider down a bit.
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living in grace

/// Interested in a TRex FT Jr. modded PT Mini pedal board? I can build it for you! ///
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Newbie
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Posts: 21



« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2009, 01:01:57 PM »

The 160A should prevent your "slap" signal levels from getting hotter, if was set right.  It's also good on slower songs, lets whole notes "float" longer before they fade away.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
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QuintrKD
Newbie
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Posts: 49


« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2009, 11:00:30 AM »

I typically use a Toadworks Mr. Squishy pedal for compression, with compress set at 11 o'clock.  Reasonably priced, gets' the job done, very clean and easy to use.
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mishicoco
Newbie
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Posts: 29


« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2010, 10:39:12 AM »

Hi everyone.
I have played bass most of my life, and always chased that perfect sound, where a player like Abraham Laborial (sorry if spelling is wrong), or Lewis Johnston, Nathan East etc can have a great solid sound then start playing slap and have all the depth and twang in the world.
I know a lot is a quality bass, most is technic but I have also been thinking that it might also be compression and or a little chorus/flanger.

What is your thoughts on this?     If you can get an optical tube compressor theyre the best,IMHO electro harmonics has the blackfinger for around 150 to 200 bucks it uses two 12ax7 tubes and uses 350 volts so it rates very highly with pro's  really makes the mids come out . I  am surprised that no one mentioned that  what a bass is made of (type of wood) has a lot do do with ,even needing a compressor. Some woods like maple (rickenbacker) or bubinga (warwick)are really hardwoods that naturally compress the sound of the bass im not really a fan of having to  use  compressors because they really can take the punch right out of your sound ,maybe just a tad to  take any harsh notes down a little ,hope that helps  Wink

Graeme
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mousekillaz
Jr. Member
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Posts: 59



« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2010, 11:10:19 PM »

any one tried a BBE opto-stomp?
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After careful thorough meticulous exacting examining scrutinizing reviewing and postulating I have concluded that I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing. Fortunately, for me,  God does!  Paul R.
Eddy
Full Member
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Posts: 143



« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2010, 05:52:14 AM »

any one tried a BBE opto-stomp?
No I haven't. I have been keeping an eye out toward compressors as of late.

I have both a dbx163 and a JoeMeek VC3 in my rack at home.
I really like the JoeMeek for bass, which has me intrigued by this:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/618616-REG/Joemeek_FLOORQ_FloorQ_Guitar_and.html
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Nashville, like L.A. without a tan!
1954bassman
Sr. Member
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Posts: 464



WWW
« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2010, 08:45:07 PM »

Wow Eddy,at $249,it should play your bass for you!  Grin
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Bass with Grace
Eddy
Full Member
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Posts: 143



« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2010, 06:27:40 AM »

Wow Eddy,at $249,it should play your bass for you!  Grin

Spot on correct, and that's why I don't have one.  Tongue

My JoeMeek is rack mounted at home and I rarely use/need compression playing live.
There's a BBE optical compressor out that I've seen priced under $100 that's interesting. Most of the comments about it are good.
I almost bought a used MXR Dyna comp last Friday as well. There was a used one in the case for $40.
I hadn't read of anyone using the dyna comp on a bass is the reason I didn't get it.
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Nashville, like L.A. without a tan!
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